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The LEGO Life

Pulling that Box of LEGO out of the Attic

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Do we even want to discuss how it got up there? Okay, yes we do. You grew up, right? You became a man and put away childish things. And you almost feel guilty about wanting to pull them down. But you’ve kept them. You didn’t let your little brother inherit them; you didn’t let your mom garage-sale them (or worse yet — sell them to a complete stranger on eBay), and they’re still sitting there in a cardboard box. Or a pile of cardboard boxes. Or maybe they never even got to the attic — they’re still in the back of your closet, or under your bed.

But you’re twenty-five. Or thirty-five. Maybe you have kids that have their own batch of bricks. And now you’re sitting there on the edge of the bed with a dusty-covered, slightly musty-smelling box that contains knights in shining armor battling green and black dragons, astronauts setting up a base on the moon for exploration, bits of Fort Legoredo still standing to defend against the bad guys, a pirate ship with the Jolly Roger hoisted … all the adventures you spent hours on every day as a kid until … something. And all your imagination was put in a cardboard box. And set aside. And forgotten.

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The LEGO Life

USPS delivers my Bricklink orders

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Imagine my surprise to pull into the parking lot at our condo complex and see a strange shadowy shape next to my front door. USPS decided to get a bit creative when delivering my packages. Note that there are two doors in the view; the brown door is our front door; the tan door to the left goes to an open-air front storage area attached to the front of the unit. Most of the times when anyone delivers (UPS, Fed-Ex, DHL, USPS) they just leave the box behind that door.

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The LEGO Life

Background for a Duck and His Plastic Bricks

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A brief history of me and LEGOs…

I have always been a LEGO lover. Some of my earliest memories involve waking up in the morning eager to see what Dad had built with my Lego bricks overnight. He didn’t make something every night, but when he did, it was usually a house, using those red slopes for the roof. Whenever I tried to reproduce the effect (at the ripe age of 5) it didn’t work as well.

Another memory, (this time a sad one), was the first Christmas I didn’t get any new Lego sets. It occurred to me that my parents believed me to have “grown up” at that point. I let them know otherwise. 🙂

And as I continued to “grow up” and we got rid of toys (yes, I still can’t believe I donated my Star Wars figures to our school’s annual fund-raiser yard sale 🙁 ), I never got rid of my barrel of Lego. Through college and grad school I would still buy a small set from time to time.

Even after I got married, I’d pull out my Lego barrel from time to time and build something. I’ve always continued to want to do something a little more, though.

Fast forward a few more years. I’ve been married for nine years. We have four kids. Our oldest is almost 6 and started getting Lego (no longer the bigger, Duplo type) sets this past Christmas. Actually, he inherited, from my cousin, a couple big boxes of sets with some of my favorite types … the pirate sets, ones that started coming out right about the time my folks quit buying them for me. 🙁

I did a little stint a year ago where I was buying Lego lots on eBay, rebuilding some of the more popular sets (Star Wars, Harry Potter, etc.) and reselling them for about a 500% profit. On the cash value, that is. When I compared it with the amount of time I was spending sorting, checking piece inventories, building, taking pictures, posting on eBay, etc., I was really only just playing. That fact *really* sunk in when I picked up a 55 pound lot. I still haven’t finished sorting through it. And at this point I’ve just been cannibalizing parts there for other projects.

So, what am I up to now? Well, I’ve been inspired by the online community of AFOLs. Also, there are a number of adults out there that make a living (or at least as a part-time job) creating and selling LEGO art, particularly sculptures and LEGO mosaics done by converting a photograph into a LEGO representation of the image. Now this, I thought, is exactly the sort of thing I’d love to do. So, combine my love for LEGOS, my savvy with computers (making use of various open-source and otherwise software packages that allow you to design with LEGOs), and my growing work in web design, and voila! Out came the start of a new website.

As I finish up various mosaics, and other MOCs, I’ll post and blog. I’d also like to start cataloging various building techniques.