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The LEGO Life

Pulling that Box of LEGO out of the Attic

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Do we even want to discuss how it got up there? Okay, yes we do. You grew up, right? You became a man and put away childish things. And you almost feel guilty about wanting to pull them down. But you’ve kept them. You didn’t let your little brother inherit them; you didn’t let your mom garage-sale them (or worse yet — sell them to a complete stranger on eBay), and they’re still sitting there in a cardboard box. Or a pile of cardboard boxes. Or maybe they never even got to the attic — they’re still in the back of your closet, or under your bed.

But you’re twenty-five. Or thirty-five. Maybe you have kids that have their own batch of bricks. And now you’re sitting there on the edge of the bed with a dusty-covered, slightly musty-smelling box that contains knights in shining armor battling green and black dragons, astronauts setting up a base on the moon for exploration, bits of Fort Legoredo still standing to defend against the bad guys, a pirate ship with the Jolly Roger hoisted … all the adventures you spent hours on every day as a kid until … something. And all your imagination was put in a cardboard box. And set aside. And forgotten.

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LEGO Tools, Tips, and Techniques

LEGO Tools: Presser-Poker

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Allan Bedford, author of The Unofficial LEGO Builder’s Guide, (a book I highly recommend), presents instructions for building this tool in his book, though he calls it a “presser.” While I’ve used it for pressing, I also use it for poking, and extracting. And I don’t really like the name, “presser,” — sounds more like a piece of dry-cleaning equipment, whereas with “poker,” I think of a fire-place tool, since I’ve had fireplaces in most homes I’ve lived in. Although that term isn’t completely satisfactory either. So, for now I’ve settled on a “Presser-Poker.”

Allan offered a basic design, and mentioned that you could use just about any number of designs. Here are a few of mine:

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LEGO Tools, Tips, and Techniques

LEGO Tip: Lose Your Building Instructions? No problem…

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Maybe they disappeared in a move. Or your baby sister tore them to shreds. Or the dog ate them. For whatever reason, most of us have, at some time, lost building instructions. Apart from trying to put the thing back together from memory, stealing your best friend’s instructions, or just plain never building the set again, there are a number of sources online for you to recover instructions.

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LEGO Tools, Tips, and Techniques

LEGO Tools: The Brick Separator

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This has to be the most obvious LEGO tool available. Besides teeth. And my teeth became very happy when this puppy hit the market! Unfortunately, it wasn’t available until after my parents decided I was too old to get any new LEGO stuff, and I did not obtain one until I was an adult. Now I have several, and use them frequently. My favorite is green (probably has something to do with that being my favorite color!).
Categories
LEGO Sculptures (3-d artwork)

LEGO Sculpture: Chocolate Chip Cookie … Made from Scratch

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Made From Scratch?

Well, yes. Not with flour, eggs, and real chocolate chips, but with real LEGO bricks, and no instructions. This piece of LEGO art was inspired by an office party. We celebrated National Dessert Day, October 14th, at my office by everyone bringing in a batch of cookies. In addition to my wife’s scrumptious M & M cookies, I brought in this sculpture.

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LEGO Mosaics

LEGO Art: Really Simple Syndication, anyone?

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What is that orange thing with wavy lines?

This symbol appears ubiquitously on the world wide web. It’s supposed to be an easy concept, but for many, “really simple syndication” may seem not so simple. Most explanations that I read when I was first getting my feet wet in the concept made it sound a lot more difficult than it really needs to be.  But I’m getting ahead of myself.

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Just For Fun

They’re Coming to Take Me Away, Ha Haaa!

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“I’ll be happy to see those nice young men in their clean white suits…” Back in 1966, the hit song “They’re Coming To Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa!” caused quite a ruckus, drawing protests from a variety of different groups. While I didn’t hit the scene for another 10 years, and wouldn’t discover the song until the early ’90’s as a Dr. Demento staple, I always found it very amusing. And maybe I’m just crazy, but it really is an innocent and funny song, right?

Anyhow, when I first saw the new minifig head above, it struck me pretty quick that it was a good epitome of the song.

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Just For Fun

THE EMPIRE: An Equal Opportunity Employer

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This MOC was inspired by my 6-year old son, who took a minifig head that had bright blue sunglasses and stuck it on the body of a storm trooper.

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LEGO Portraits

LEGO Portrait: Christopher

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This is my son, Christopher. He is six and very proud of having lost two teeth in recent months. The mosaic doesn’t actually portray him minus two teeth, though that might be a fun one to try. The photo I used was taken a few months ago, and I’d actually done a lot of the preliminary work for the mosaic (cropping, converting it to a plan in PicToBrick and Photoshop), but I’ve had several other projects going on as well.

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LEGO Portraits

LEGO Portrait: Bob and Larry

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A Few Quick Facts:

Size: 30″ x 30″

Pieces used: 4,212 (1×1’s, 1×2’s, 1×3’s, 1×4’s, 1×6’s, 1×8’s, 2×2’s, 2×3’s, 2×4’s)

Colors used: 15  (Black, Blue, Brown, Dark Blue, Dark Grey (dk. bley), Lime, Light Blue, Green, Light Grey (lt. bley), Orange, Pink, Red, Tan, White, Yellow)

The inspiration for this portrait mosaic

After the great way my Duckingham cartoon character turned out in a previous post, I wanted to do another, just for fun. The boys have watched Jonah 3 or 4 times in the last week, and Patrick keeps asking to see it again.